A Very American Coup

Will we see scenes like this on Main Street USA?
Will we see scenes like this on Main Street USA?

W.J. Astore

Back in January 2010, I wrote the following article for TomDispatch.com on the possibility of “a very American coup” occurring in conjunction with the presidential election of 2016. I make no claims to prescience: for example, the “great recession” I predicted didn’t come to pass, and there are as yet very few protesters in the streets, and no concerted movement rallying disaffected troops that I’m aware of. Nevertheless, I think there’s validity to some of my predictions in this article, and I encourage your comments in the section below on the path our country is treading as we head into 2016.

Here is the article, unchanged from when I wrote it nearly six years ago.

A Very American Coup
Coming Soon to a Hometown Near You
By William J. Astore

The wars in distant lands were always going to come home, but not this way.

It’s September 2016, year 15 of America’s “Long War” against terror.  As weary troops return to the homeland, a bitter reality assails them: despite their sacrifices, America is losing.

Iraq is increasingly hostile to remaining occupation forces.  Afghanistan is a riddle that remains unsolved: its army and police forces are untrustworthy, its government corrupt, and its tribal leaders unsympathetic to the vagaries of U.S. intervention.  Since the Obama surge of 2010, a trillion more dollars have been devoted to Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and other countries in the vast shatter zone that is central Asia, without measurable returns; nothing, that is, except the prolongation of America’s Great Recession, now entering its tenth year without a sustained recovery in sight.

Disillusioned veterans are unable to find decent jobs in a crumbling economy.  Scarred by the physical and psychological violence of war, fed up with the happy talk of duplicitous politicians who only speak of shared sacrifices, they begin to organize.  Their motto: take America back.

Meanwhile, a lame duck presidency, choking on foreign policy failures, finds itself attacked even for its putative successes.  Health-care reform is now seen to have combined the inefficiency and inconsistency of government with the naked greed and exploitative talents of corporations.  Medical rationing is a fact of life confronting anyone on the high side of 50.  Presidential rhetoric that offered hope and change has lost all resonance.  Mainstream media outlets are discredited and disintegrating, resulting in new levels of information anarchy.

Protest, whether electronic or in the streets, has become more common — and the protestors in those streets increasingly carry guns, though as yet armed violence is minimal.  A panicked administration responds with overlapping executive orders and legislation that is widely perceived as an attack on basic freedoms.

Tapping the frustration of protesters — including a renascent and mainstreamed “tea bag” movement — the former captains and sergeants, the ex-CIA operatives and out-of-work private mercenaries of the War on Terror take action.  Conflict and confrontation they seek; laws and orders they increasingly ignore.  As riot police are deployed in the streets, they face a grim choice: where to point their guns?  Not at veterans, they decide, not at America’s erstwhile heroes.

A dwindling middle-class, still waving the flag and determined to keep its sliver-sized portion of the American dream, throws its support to the agitators.  Wages shrinking, savings exhausted, bills rising, the sober middle can no longer hold.  It vents its fear and rage by calling for a decisive leader and the overthrow of a can’t-do Congress.

Savvy members of traditional Washington elites are only too happy to oblige.  They too crave order and can-do decisiveness — on their terms.  Where better to find that than in the ranks of America’s most respected institution: the military?

A retired senior officer who led America’s heroes in central Asia is anointed.  His creed: end public disorder, fight the War on Terror to a victorious finish, put America back on top.  The United States, he says, is the land of winners, and winners accept no substitute for victory.  Nominated on September 11, 2016, Patriot Day, he marches to an overwhelming victory that November, embraced in the streets by an American version of the post-World War I German Freikorps and the police who refuse to suppress them.  A concerned minority is left to wonder (and tremble) at the de facto military coup that occurred so quickly, and yet so silently, in their midst.

It Can Happen Here, Unless We Act

Yes, it can happen here.  In some ways, it’s already happening.  But the key question is: at this late date, how can it be stopped?  Here are some vectors for a change in course, and in mindset as well, if we are to avoid our own stealth coup:

1. Somehow, we need to begin to reverse the ongoing militarization of this country, especially our ever-rising “defense” budgets.  The most recent of these, we’ve just learned, is a staggering $708 billion for fiscal year 2011 — and that doesn’t even include the $33 billion President Obama has requested for his latest surge in Afghanistan.  We also need to get rid of the idea that anyone who suggests even minor cuts in defense spending is either hopelessly naïve or a terrorist sympathizer.  It’s time as well to call a halt to the privatization of military activity and so halt the rise of security contractors like Xe (formerly Blackwater), thereby weakening the corporate profit motive that supports and underpins the American version of perpetual war.  It’s time to begin feeling chastened, not proud, that we’re by far the number one country in the world in arms manufacturing and the global arms trade.

2. Let’s downsize our global mission rather than endlessly expanding our military footprint.  It’s time to have a military capable of defending this country, not fighting endless wars in distant lands while garrisoning the globe.

3. Let’s stop paying attention to major TV and cable networks that rely onretired senior military officers, most of whom have ties both to the Pentagon and military contractors, for “unbiased” commentary on our wars.  If we insist on fighting our perpetual “frontier” wars, let’s start insisting as well that they be covered in all their bitter reality: the death, the mayhem, the waste, the prisons, and the torture.  Why is our war coverage invariably sanitized to “PG” or even “G,” when we can go to the movies anytime and see “R” rated, pornographically violent films?  And by the way, it’s time to be more critical of the government’s and the media’s use of language and propaganda.  Mindlessly parroting the Patriot Act doesn’t make you patriotic.

4. It’s time to elect a president who doesn’t surround himself with senior “civilian” advisors and ambassadors who are actually retired military generals and admirals, one who won’t accept a Nobel Peace Prize by defending war in theory and escalating it in practice.

5. Let’s toughen up.  Let’s stop deferring to authority figures who promise to “protect” us while abridging our rights.  Let’s stop bowing down before men and women in uniform, before they start thinking that it’s their right to be worshipped and act accordingly.

6. Let’s act now to relieve the sort of desperation bred by joblessness and hopelessness that could lead many — notably male workers suffering from the “He-Cession” — to see a militarized solution in “the homeland” as a credible last resort.  It’s the economy, stupid, but with Main Street’s health, not Wall Street’s, in our focus.

7. Let’s take Sarah Palin and her followers seriously.  They’re tapping into anger that’s real and spreading.  Don’t let them become the voices of the angry working (and increasingly unemployed) classes.

8. Recognize that we face real enemies in our world, the most powerful of which aren’t in distant Afghanistan or Yemen but here at home.  The essence of our struggle to sustain our faltering democracy should not be against “terrorists,” with their shoe and crotch bombs, but against various powerful, perfectly legal groups here whose interests lie in a Pentagon that only grows ever stronger.

9. Stop thinking the U.S. is uniquely privileged.  Don’t take it on faith that God is on our side.  Forget about God blessing America.  If you believe in God, get out there and start trying to earn His blessing through deeds.

10. And, most important of all, remember that fear is the mind-killer that makes militarism possible.  Ramping up “terror” is an amazingly effective way of shredding our Constitution.  Putting our “safety” above all else is asking for trouble.  The only way we’ll be completely safe from the big bad terrorists, after all, is when we’re all living in a maximum security state.  Think of walking down the street while always being subject to a “full-body scan.”

That’s my top 10 things we need to do.  It’s a daunting list and I’m sure you have a few ideas of your own.  But have faith.  Ultimately, it all boils down to Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s words to a nation suffering through the Great Depression: the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.  These words came to mind recently as I read the following missive from a friend and World War II veteran who’s seen tough times:

“It’s very hard for me to accept how soft the American people have become. In 1941, with the western world under assault by powerful and deadly forces, and a large armada of ships and planes attacking us directly, I never heard a word of fear as we faced three powerful nations as enemies. Sixteen million of us went into the military with the very real possibility of death and I never once heard of fear, except from those exposed to danger. Now, our people let [their leaders] terrify them into accepting the destruction of our economy, our image in the world, and our democracy… All this over a small group of religious fanatics [mostly] from Saudi Arabia whom we kowtow to so we can drive 8-cylinder SUV’s.  Pathetic!

“How many times have I stood in ‘security lines’ at airports and when I complained of the indignity of taking off shoes and not having water and the manhandling of passengers, have well educated people smugly said to me, ‘Well, they’re just keeping us safe.’ I look at the airport bullshit as a training ground to turn Americans into docile sheep in a totalitarian state.”

A public conditioned to act like sheep, to “support our troops” no matter what, to cower before the idea of terrorism, is a public ready to be herded.  A military that’s being used to fight unwinnable wars is a military prone to return home disaffected and with scores to settle.

Angry and desperate veterans and mercenaries already conditioned to violence, merging with “tea baggers” and other alienated groups, could one day form our own Freikorps units, rioting for violent solutions to national decline.  Recall that the Nazi movement ultimately succeeded in the early 1930s because so many middle-class Germans were scared as they saw their wealth, standard of living, and status all threatened by the Great Depression.

If our Great Recession continues, if decent jobs remain scarce, if the mainstream media continue to foster fear and hatred, if returning troops are disaffected and their leaders blame politicians for “not being tough enough,” if one or two more terrorist attacks succeed on U.S. soil, wouldn’t this country be well primed for a coup by any other name?

Don’t expect a “Seven Days in May” scenario.  No American Caesar will return to Washington with his legions to decapitate governmental authority.  Why not?  Because he won’t have to.

As long as we continue to live in perpetual fear in an increasingly militarized state, we establish the preconditions under which Americans will be nailed to, and crucified on, a cross of iron.

Copyright 2010 William J. Astore

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “A Very American Coup

  1. Concerning you points 6 & 7. Who will become the “voices” of the unemployed and underemployed angry men and women?
    The front page of the Erie Times-News this morning has the huge headline “HUGE LOSS.” General Electric, one of Erie’s largest remaining industrial employers, has announced a layoff of 1,500 jobs in neighboring Lawrence Park. The paper does a nice job of explaining that this will mean the $106 million in lost wages, having a ripple effect on businesses throughout the community. That there will be more people, formerly well-paid workers, competing for the limited number of minimum wage jobs available. Will this result in anger or depression and despair?

    Like

  2. “Yes, it can happen here. In some ways, it’s already happening. But the key question is: at this late date, how can it be stopped?”

    To my mind, the key question is: why would you want to stop it? You have painted an eloquent picture of much that is wrong with the USA in 2015. Surely it is those who are in power who must bear the responsibility – and, indeed, who presumably intended for things to end up as they are. So isn’t the first logical step towards making things better to get rid of them? That cannot be done within the current system, as voters do not have access to candidates who would undertake significant change. They simply don’t get nominated as candidates.

    Like

    1. Good point. But my “what if” scenario essentially imagines a quasi-fascist coup, the kind that Sinclair Lewis wrote about, one that abridges our liberties even further, essentially turning America into a police state — all in the name of patriotism and God, of course. As Lewis said, if fascism comes to the USA, it’ll be carrying a cross and wrapped in the flag.

      If Petraeus hadn’t shot himself in the foot, I could have well imagined him emerging as a savior in 2016, a nominal Republican dedicated to defeating Hillary in the service of a thoroughly militarized state.

      Like

      1. I am glad you write of a “quasi-fascist” coup. “Fascism” is something of an ink-blot word; the meanings different people attribute to it says more about their personal political beliefs than they do about some objective set of ideas or state of a society. We have been moving towards a curtailment of our rights as citizens and towards a more militarized police state, and we do have large numbers of people who are racist or ethnocentric to the extent of using one or another category of persons as scapegoats.
        A few years ago, an essay by “Dr.” Lawrence Britt was very popular on the internet, listing 14 key characteristics of fascism. As it turned out, he was not a PhD in political science, but a retired businessman, who denied that he himself had ever claimed to have a doctorate. “The Right Stuff” has an overly polemical rebuttal of Britt’s essay. http://therightstuff.biz/2014/01/22/fascism-no-one-a-response-to-dr-laurence-britt/
        I call it over-polemical, because the writer seemed to be angry about any suggestion that the U.S. is, in several important ways, becoming more like Nazi Germany or Fascist Italy.

        Like

  3. I agree with your concerns about America heading toward a slow motion coup. All around me, I see fear and anger, but all too often it is combined with apathy or resignation that nothing can be done to change the corrupt system. People argue that our government is bought and paid for by Wall Street and multinational companies and we as citizens can do nothing to change it. I think the current push by the President and some members of Congress to pass TPP legislation is going to be very telling. Can a grassroots movement with the help of opposing advocacy groups such as Public Citizen and others fighting against this horrific power grab be successful? Time will tell. I am hoping there will be a groundswell of activism from Americans opposing this legislation but, frankly, I am not all that optimistic. In spite of that, I will do whatever I can as one citizen to pressure my elected officials to oppose this legislation
    .

    Like

  4. #11. Push for United Nations reform which makes continuing membership linked to signing the Rome Statute and joining the International Criminal Court. Those nations which choose not to join, effectively leaving the United Nations, will suffer the consequences associated with being a pariah state in opposing criminal accountability for war crimes. Such a UN reform would separate the wheat from the chaff in regard to which nations are serious about ending war, force through public global opinion unanimous membership in the ICC and in essence end war on Earth as we’ve known it. If this UN reform were passed and operational twenty years ago, one can only imagine how different and more peaceful the last twenty years could have been. For example, Bush, Blair, Cheney et al may have been constrained from launching the lie-fueled Iraq War if they saw the strong possibility of prosecution, millions of innocent human beings wouldn’t have suffered or perished, trillions of dollars could have become directed toward positive, worthy projects, and the reality of the Middle East today is entirely different.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s