Textures

W.J. Astore

A sunny day has me out in the field taking photographs. The general theme is nature’s textures. Here are a few images that nature gifted to me:

I’ve always loved tree rings.
Tree moss
Tree bark. So much character trees have
From trees to wood pilings and water
Earth and water and lots of organics — a sort of peat
Ice and sky and trees and water and sun

If you have the chance, get out and enjoy nature. She’s always giving us little gifts if we have time to pause, look around, and open our senses to her.

16 thoughts on “Textures

  1. MAGNIFICENT. Thank you for sharing the gifts you received today. I feel the same reverence for trees that you do. Have you read the book. “Tree,” by Melina Semphill Watts? If not, I can’t recommend it highly enough, and I think you particularly would enjoy it.

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      1. If you don’t mind giving Bezos a few more bucks, it’s available on Amazon. Also, it was on a list of titles I was invited to review from the Independent Book Publishers Association, so it might be available through that organization.

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  2. Esquisite photos. Nature must always be our core. As soon as we separate off we get into our huge messes, perhaps out of sheer arrogance and ignorance? Thank you for sharing these, nancy

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  3. If only you allowed pictures to be attached to comments! I have a couple of tree bark doozies.

    BTW: some fellow old timers here may know that “doozy” comes from the Duesenberg car that was the choice of the 1% back in the Great Depression?

    I visited an old car museum years ago and they had a poster on the wall listing car manufacturers producing in 1920. There were 2500!

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      1. Thanks for the offer Prof. A

        I have the solution! Imgur, where people can put up their own images and make them public.

        My favorite bark picture is this one of a paperbark maple near where I live. It sure deserves the name and I’ve never seen another example anywhere. It’s growing fine in someone’s front yard.

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          1. Thanks for the guided hike, what a cool experience you provided for us all. I love the photo of the Usnea; a friend helped us tincture some last spring.
            I wanted to share a lead to one of my heroes. He too fell in love with the Forest; and was a giant for the environmental movement. You may have already met him in your reading, but maybe others haven’t had the pleasure of meeting him.

            https://becomingborealis.com/viktor-schauberger-living-energy/

            Observe and emulate nature… is a mantra he taught me and it is so liberating.

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          2. the mangyan forest people, here on mindoro island where we live, communicate by replicating the sounds of nature: wind lashings, bird calls and their wing flappings, ghekko gurglings, snake hissings, palm trunks bending during typhoons, water coursing thru stream beds, cocoanuts dropping onto the jungle floor, scending wave crests along the coast crashing onto shorelines w/ different geomorphologies, humming mossies, wasp dronings, ant columns marching in their serried ranks along different surfaces… they even have a repertoire of unique sounds created by the variegated shapes and sizes of leaf-stirrings. incroyable! mangyans’ communication skills far outstrip our banausic verbiage.

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  4. exquisite fotos reflecting the in’sight’ful textures we should all be touching. thank you for inspiring my visual and tactile sensorium’s awareness, wja.

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